Cigarette Smoking Is Harmful To Your Health

From the side of the world where I call my sweet home, all cigarette packets have these words in bold “Cigarette smoking is harmful to your health”.

But what I have never understood is why some one with a sane mind wants to continue harming their health.

Although if there were not smokers, the economy of the country would be affected greatly, health issues must be personally crucial.

One thing that hurts greatly is the fact that those who smoke nowadays are young women and men should be healthy mothers and fathers of tomorrow.

What is more, many of the people who smoke are also alcohol abusers a thing that adds up to their health risks.

Why do people smoke?

If you asked different smokers why they do it yet the producing company warn of the dangers involved, they will give you many reasons.

However those I happened to ask gave some of these reasons:

Names not real

Eric who is a teenager said that if he does not smoke, then his peers would not consider him a male stallion with vitality and class. He gave the same reasons for extravagant clubbing and drinking. As he put it, smoking and drinking is part of having fun with friends as young as you.

When I heard Sammy, a family man coughing like a tuberculosis patient I requested to know why he continued smoking. He said that cigarette smoking takes you to another world with no piles of unpaid bills, without loneliness or frequent fights with your wife. For him, a puff is like being in a tranquil spirit that does not bother about the hardships of this modern life.

Shirley is a lady who said that smoking and drinking is just but a means of experiencing life from both sides. In other words if her male counterpart can do something, then she can do it better. Moreover, she confirms that a woman who smokes appears tough and untouchable from the outside and it is hard for her to be taken advantage of.

So I concluded that smoking is rampant because someone wants to have fun, show off, and fit in among the peers, escape real world problems among much other stuff.

A smoking addiction means a person has formed an irrepressible dependence on cigarettes to the point where stopping smoking would cause severe emotional, mental, or physical reactions.

Harms of cigarette smoking

As the producer says, cigarette smoking could damage most of your internal organs, cause cancer and death. Read what can happen to your beautiful and healthy:

Eyes

Chemicals in tobacco cause harm to the macula -the most sensitive part of the retina, the back of the eye. Minute blood vessels can rupture through the macula, leading to permanent harm.

Reliable recent research states that there is a strong association between smoking and a number of common eye diseases, including age- related macular deterioration, glaucoma and cataract.

Smoking causes morphological and functional changes to the lens and retina due to its atherosclerotic and thrombosis effects on the ocular capillaries.

Also, it improves the creation of free radicals and reduces the levels of antioxidants in the blood circulation, aqueous humor and ocular tissue. Eventually, constant smoking may continue more harm and front a permanent blindness.

Mouth and esophagus

Smoking is a risk factor for all cancers associated with the larynx, oral cavity and esophagus. Serious cases, makes it difficult for one to swallow solid food because these parts kind of shrinks.

read more information on the site below.

Loss Of Penis Sensitivity And Back Problems – Are They Linked?

Penis sensitivity is of primary importance for a man’s sexual satisfaction; the proper stimulation of the nerve endings in the penis is what sends a man into bouts of ecstasy. Yet diminished penis sensitivity occurs frequently in men, for a variety of reasons – and one of them could be related to back problems. Maintaining adequate penis health, then, includes paying attention to issues affecting the back and spinal column as well as the organ itself.

Why back problems?
It seems odd that a problem with the back could have an effect on that delicious tingling sensation that men enjoy when the penis is being stimulated. It might make some sort of sense if there was a connection with, say, a guy’s posterior or his ears, which are often considered erogenous zones. While running a soft finger down the back does produce a nice sensation, the back is hardly thought of as a hotbed of sensual stimulation.

And yet there is a direct link. But to understand why, one needs to look at the brain first.

The brain
Guys may be said to think with their male members, but the brain is really the dude in charge. The brain’s responsibilities include a major role in how a person “feels” physical sensations.

How does it do this? Basically, the brain is connected to a massive network of nerve pathways that drop from the skull and run throughout the body. When a person touches a substance or when an outside source touches him, the receptors send a signal up the nerve pathways to the brain. The brain processes this information and sends a response: “Whoa, that’s hot!” “Hey, don’t stop stroking!” “Would it kill you to use a little lubricant?”

The spine
These pathways use the spine as the major “gathering route” between the brain and the nerve endings. If the nerve system is made up of pathways, the spine is like the super expressway for the nerve system. And just like on a real highway, a little incident in the spine can have major consequences.

Significant back issues, in which the spine and its collective components suffer a major injury, can cause severe damage in several areas, including the relay of nerve information. But even tiny injuries, which may seem insignificant, can cause a diminishing of feeling in an area. When that damage is in one of the neural pathways that processes information involving the penis, this can cause a loss of penis sensitivity.

Treatment
In some cases, the injury can be such that a doctor’s aid is required to assess the damage and to determine what treatments are necessary to restore the nerve system to its proper functioning. Sometimes surgery is required.

In other cases, however, much less drastic measures can be employed. For example, many men with a loss of penis sensitivity find that therapeutic exercises, healthy dietary alterations and application of specially formulated crèmes can help restore much-needed penile sensation.

The use of a high-quality penis health crème (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil) should be part of a restorative treatment plan. Regular application of a crème that includes acetyl L-carnitine may be beneficial. This ingredient is neuroprotective and has been proven to assist in treating peripheral nerve damage, such as may occur on the member from years of use. In addition, a crème that includes a wide range of necessary vitamins, such as A, B5, C, D and E, can help to further enable the health of the penis by enhancing the healing process and allowing the member to become more fully responsive to sensation. And a stimulated male organ is a happy male organ.

Health Insurance Explained In Plain English

Understanding health insurance and the health industry is much easier if you recognize some of the basic terminology and how it applies to you and your health insurance policy. If you have a health insurance plan and aren’t sure how it works or what the terminology means, take a few minutes to read the explanations below. Knowing these terms and what they mean to you can greatly aid you in dealing with your health care providers, insurance company, insurance agent, or during the health benefits shopping process.

Benefit Year
This is the 12-month period in which your benefits are calculated. Most insurance companies use a CALENDAR year, which is January 1 to December 31, but a few will use a 12 month period from when your policy goes into effect. For example, if your insurance goes into effect on June 1, the END of your benefit year is May 31. Make sure that you understand how your benefit year will be calculated.

Deductible
Deductible means the amount of money you must pay out of your pocket for medical expenses EACH YEAR before your health insurance begins paying out. Deductibles are usually reset to 0 at the beginning of each calendar or benefit year. Many insurance companies offer health plans that have benefits that are not subject to having to meet your deductible each year such as doctors office visits, immunizations, wellness or routine exams, etc. An easy way to remember what this term means and how it works is this:

When you have incurred medical expenses, all bills must be sent to the insurance company. When the insurance company looks at your bills, they then look at your policy and see how things are covered. They will then add up what the combined medical expenses have been for the year to date: determine what your deductible is and how much you have already paid towards meeting your deductible for the year, and pay out according to how your insurance policy says it will.

So in a nutshell, the insurance company is “deducting” your financial responsibility for medical expenses each year from the total combined medical expenses before they have any responsibility to pay out…hence the term “deductible”.

Co-Pay
A co-pay is an amount that is paid by the patient to a provider at the time of service. It will either be a flat fee (like $15 or $20) or it can be a percentage of the service provided. The percentages or fee may vary depending on the type of service provided. A co-pay is different than “coinsurance” – see next.

Coinsurance
Coinsurance is the percentage paid by the insurance company after you pay the deductible. Example: Your health insurance pays 70%, you pay 30%. The insurance company pays 70% coinsurance, you pay 30% coinsurance. Most health insurance policies will have a limit on the amount of coinsurance you have to pay out each year this is known as your “Annual Coinsurance Maximum” or “Stop-loss”.

Annual Coinsurance Maximum
After paying your deductible and after paying your coinsurance (classically 20% or 30% of medical expenses) to a certain dollar amount, your health insurance will pay 100% for the remaining costs in the calendar year. Example: After you pay your deductible, your health insurance pays 70% of medical expenses and you pay 30%. Once you reach the coinsurance maximum, you no longer pay 30% of the medical expenses because the insurance pays 100%.

Out of Pocket Maximum or Stop Loss
Stop Loss is the maximum amount of money you will have to pay out of your pocket in the benefit year.

Lifetime Maximum
This is the limit of the money the health insurance will pay out over your lifetime. Most major medical health insurance policies will be a $2 million lifetime maximum, while others will go as high as a $12 million lifetime maximum. In general, it is not recommended to have a policy with less than a $2 million lifetime maximum.

Office Visits
When you visit a doctor in their office they normally bill the health insurance company for an “office visit.” Most health insurance plans pay office visit expenses at the coinsurance (generally 70% or 80%) after the deductible. Some health insurance plans pay office visit expenses at the coinsurance rate but waive the deductible, which means you don’t have to reach the deductible amount before they will cover their portion of the expense. Still other health insurance plans pay office visit expenses in full after a co-pay (usually $25 or $30). It should also be noted that office visits can be classified in two different categories. One category is usually called “Routine Care,” “Wellness visits” or “Preventative care” (see definition below). The other type of office visit is deemed as “Medically Necessary” (see definition below). Certain health insurance policies cover each of these types of visits differently and other plans do not cover them at all. If having these types of office visits covered by your health insurance policy is important to you, make sure you let your agent know so that they can help find the right plan for you.

Preventive Care
Preventive Care is classically defined as routine exams, immunizations, well child care, and cancer screenings. These include your yearly exams and checkups for things such as physicals, pap smears, mammograms, etc. Not all plans cover preventive care. It may not be a wise use of your money to have preventative care included in your plan if you never go to the doctor. A good health insurance agent can help you determine if this is necessary coverage for you.

Medically Necessary
These are the visits utilized for your smaller ailments such as colds, flu, ear infections or minor accidents. Not all plans cover ‘medically necessary’ visits, so make sure you know if your policy includes these exams if you need them covered. You may consider purchasing accident insurance or adding a rider (explained below) to your policy to cover these types of issues.

Diagnostic Lab and X-Ray
These are tests involving laboratory or imaging services (such as x-ray, CAT scan, etc.) to diagnose a health problem. These services are usually paid at the coinsurance (typically 70% or 80%) after the deductible.

Chiropractic Care
When you visit a chiropractor for spinal manipulation or other services, these expenses are customarily paid at the coinsurance rate (70% or 80%) either after the deductible is met, or by waiving the deductible. Most health insurance plans limit the number of chiropractic visits/services to 10 or 12 per year – especially if the deductible is waived. After this, additional visits are not paid by the health insurance plan, and you will be responsible for the full amount of the bill.

Inpatient or Outpatient Care
When you receive care from a hospital (inpatient or outpatient services), these expenses are customarily paid at the coinsurance rate (70% or 80%) after the deductible has been met.

Emergency Room
When you receive care from a hospital emergency room, these expenses are customarily paid at the coinsurance level (70% or 80%) after the deductible. Most health insurance plans also require you to pay an additional co-pay (commonly $75-$100) for each emergency room visit. A number of plans waive this additional co-pay if you are actually admitted to the hospital through the emergency room and the plan will pay as an inpatient service. A plan can sometimes be structured to have separate coverage for accidents as an additional rider (see definition below) to your policy.

Prescription Medications
Prescription medications can be classified as generic, brand name, or non-preferred brand name (see below for definitions). Please Note: Not all health insurance plans pay for prescription drugs, so if you already take prescription drugs or think you will need help in the future with prescription drugs, you will want to make sure that you are purchasing a plan that includes this coverage. Prescription drugs may be covered at the coinsurance rate (70-80%) after a deductible specifically for prescription drugs is met, other plans may include Prescription drugs in the total deductible for the plan.

Generic Medications
Drug manufacturers are permitted to sell a generic version of a medication after the patent expires for the brand name medication (generally 20 years after the brand name medication was registered). Generic medications are equivalent to the corresponding brand name medication, but are much less expensive than the brand name medication. Health insurance plans frequently provide better payment for generic medications as an incentive for you to ask for the generic version. About half of all prescription medications filled in the United States are filled with generic medications.

Brand Name Medications
Brand name medications are more expensive than generic medications. Most health insurance plans create a limited list of brand name medications that they will pay for and many health insurance plans also provide less coverage for brand name medications than for their generic counterparts.

Non-Preferred Brand Name Medications
Most health insurance plans create a limited list of brand name medications they will pay for. If your brand name medication is not on this list, it might be paid at a lower level under “Non-Preferred Brand Name Medications.”

Maternity
Some health insurance plans cover the cost of maternity, which includes doctor and hospital charges for prenatal care as well as labor and delivery. Maternity is expensive to add into a health insurance policy because it is considered a “guaranteed expense” for the insurance company. If a woman becomes pregnant, it is a safe bet that there is going to be medical expenses incurred! If there are no complications and the birth goes well, the insurance company will be out a large monetary portion of the cost of delivery and even more if there are problems with the delivery or the newborn. Insurance companies price maternity so that they can still maintain profits. In some cases it may be best to save your money and pay for the prenatal care and the delivery out of your own pocket (or on a credit card) and let the insurance cover the catastrophic events. The difference you save in the monthly cost of having maternity coverage may be well worth it to you. Remember, once you have a policy that covers maternity, you can’t just remove the maternity coverage after the pregnancy is done! You will continue to pay for that maternity coverage for as long as you have that policy.

Mammography
Mammography is a specific type of imaging that uses a low-dose x-ray system for the examination of breasts to detect early breast cancer in women experiencing no symptoms and to detect and diagnose breast disease in women experiencing symptoms. Current guidelines from the American Cancer Society (ACS), and the American Medical Association (AMA) recommend a screening mammography every year for women, beginning at age 40. Various plans will have automatic coverage for mammograms but some will not. Several states (like Washington State, for example) have specific guidelines that require companies to have coverage for mammograms in their policies as an automatic benefit.

Mental Health
Outpatient mental health services include visits to a licensed counselor, therapist, or psychiatrist. Inpatient mental health services include admission to a psychiatric hospital. Many plans do not cover mental health services.

Rehabilitation Therapy
Rehabilitation therapy may include physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, message therapy, cardiac rehabilitation, and chronic pain therapy. Most health insurance plans limit rehabilitation therapy to a certain number of visits per calendar year or to a certain dollar amount that they will pay for rehabilitation for either the year or for a lifetime.

Rider
Anything that changes the way your policy acts by default is called a “Rider”. A rider can be anything from an exclusion of coverage for a medical condition, or additional coverage for potential conditions. (As in an “accident rider” mentioned earlier in this report)

Occupational Coverage/On the job coverage
The largest portion of health insurance plans do not cover occupational related medical expenses. This can be a HUGE pitfall for self employed people. Always make sure that if you need to be covered while you are working that your plan will give you “on the job coverage”. If you get injured or sick while you are on the job and you do not have Workman’s Compensation or Labor and Industries accident coverage, you may have to pay for ALL medical expenses out of your own pocket.

Vision Coverage
Vision coverage is usually broken into two parts: vision exam, and vision hardware. Vision exam benefits include the cost of a refractive exam used to test vision acuity (20/20, 20/40, etc.). Vision hardware represents the cost of eye glasses or contact lenses. A number of health insurance plans do not cover vision exams or hardware. However, medical issues relating to the health of the eye (like Glaucoma) are almost always covered under the regular medical portion of the health insurance plan.

Doctor Directory
Each insurance company will have a list of doctors that the company has negotiated terms for payment of services with. You can go to the insurance company’s website to find a listing of contracted “preferred providers”.

This information may help you understand a policy that you already have, or aid you in understanding a policy that you may be thinking about purchasing. The more knowledge you have about what the industry “jargon” means, the more you will be able to make informed decisions about the insurance you choose to use.

By: Shad Woodman