How To Achieve A Healthy Bmi

Your body mass index, or as it is known in short BMI is a representation of your health based on your height and weight. Health professionals around the world use your BMI to determine whether someone is overweight or clinically obese. It is used as a simple method of working out whether someone’s weight is putting their health at risk. So just how do you calculate your BMI and how do you know what is considered ‘normal?’

You can find out what your BMI is by entering your weight and height into a BMI calculator, of which there are numerous on the Internet. Alternatively, if you don’t have access to the Internet you can simply visit your GP or local health centre where you’re body mass index can be calculated for you. So if you weigh 137 pounds and your height is 5”6 your BMI will be 22.1, which is within the normal range, meaning your body mass is healthy. A healthy body mass index should fall between 18.5 and 24.9; if yours is over 24.9 then you are considered to be overweight and a person whose body mass is under 18.5 is considered underweight.

Your body mass index is important to aspects of your health. For example if you are considered to be overweight then you are at a greater risk of developing serious illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, having a stroke and developing certain cancers.

It is however important to keep in mind that the results of your BMI is only one representation of your measure of health. There are many other factors that play an important role in your health and having a healthy BMI doesn’t mean your body is in perfect health. Sometimes it can underestimate body fat in older people and those who have lost muscle fat. In other cases it can sometimes overestimate body fat in athletes and those who have a muscular build. In most cases however you should take it as a good estimate of your weight, so what do you do if you fall into the under or overweight categories? It is important that if you are currently in these categories that you try and get your body mass index into what is classed as ‘normal.’

Losing or gaining weight should be done in a healthy manner. You should start by manipulating the BMI calculator in order to find out how much weight you need to lose or gain. You need to work out where you are currently with your health and where you want to be. Once you are at this stage you can let in some outside help to change your diet, fitness regime and overall health.

You need a good weight management program that creates a diet plan to suit your taste, an exercise plan that targets your trouble areas and a lifestyle plan that will help you with your weight problem. For example you may be advised that the best diet for you is the low GI diet, which helps you achieve faster weight loss and reduces the chance of re-gaining the weight; it does this by decreasing your body fat not muscle or water mass, it increases satiety and reduces hunger pangs.

As well as being advised on the correct diet you will be advised on the right exercise plan. Some great examples of this are high-paced walking, moderate swimming and cycling.

There is plenty of help available when it comes to reducing your body mass index through the right diet and exercise; all you have to do is make sure that you choose the right plan for your situation. So don’t go it alone, take advantage of the help that is available to you and get a healthy BMI now!

The Hpv Vaccine: Why It Won’t Promote Sexual Promiscuity

Ever since the FDA approved the HPV vaccine two years ago, its introduction into the health community has been embroiled in a medical, social, cultural and political controversy. At first glance, the debut of a vaccine to fight most cervical cancers looks like an exciting advance in the history of women’s health. However, many people are unable to separate the ethics from the basic scientific facts: the virus is transmitted through sexual contact and hence the vaccine is recommended for 11 or 12-year-old girls, before they first become sexually active. The perceived possibility that administering such a vaccine to prevent a sexually transmitted disease could promote sexual promiscuity has trumped all other ethical debates, leading some people to cast its benefits aside. As a mother, I can understand why many parents are concerned about this issue and put off vaccinating their daughters. However, in addition to being a mother, I am a physician, and I therefore believe that by putting off vaccination, we effectively strip our daughters from their chances of protecting themselves from the two major cancer causing HPV types.

According to a Newsweek article from February 25, 2008, only two out of every 10 women in the U.S. in the approved age group have received the vaccine so far. In another new survey of almost 10,000 parents, only 49 percent said they would get their daughters vaccinated with the HPV vaccine at the recommended age of 9 to 12 years. Even though 68 percent planned to vaccinate their daughters at 13 to 15 years of age, and 86 percent said they would vaccinate at 16 to 18 years of age, they might be too late — because the vaccine can only prevent and not cure HPV. The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), an agency that collects data on the sexual behavior of American teenagers, reports that teenage girls are already sexually active: 13 percent of them by the time they are 15, 43 percent of them by age 17, and 70 percent of them by age 19. Of the sexually active 13-21 year age group, 70 percent show evidence of HPV infections within a few to several months of when they start having sex — most of which could easily be prevented by vaccinating preadolescent girls. In addition, many parents are uncomfortable talking to their preadolescents about sexual issues; meaning uneducated teens could make problematic sexual choices not only without realizing the consequences of their actions, but also without the protection from HPV that the vaccine provides.

Again, bear in mind that the vaccine is preventive — it is only effective if administered prior to exposure to the virus. Therefore, the vaccine will not treat the existing infections. This is why it’s so crucial to administer the vaccine when girls are young, before any chance of sexual activity, including sexual contact without intercourse. In addition, there are several other scientific reasons why the vaccine is recommended in the 11-12 year old groups. Unfortunately, it is beyond the scope of this article to discuss those facts.

But, won’t vaccinating young girls against a STD cause them to become less sexually inhibited and more promiscuous by giving them a license not to worry about the consequences of sex? Won’t it eliminate a deterrent to teenage sex and therefore encourage it? Highly unlikely: because teens rarely factor the possibility of getting HPV into their decisions to have sex.

Current research in adolescent sexual behavior shows that not one, but a variety of factors influence teenage sexual behavior, such as their socio-economic status, their moral and religious values, their sexual attitudes, and the influence of family, friends, and the society they live in. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that a vaccine against a single kind of STD would play a more significant role in adolescent decision making than these factors paired with their responsibility, good judgment, and the boundaries of accepted sexual behavior.

According to NSFG, the top two factors influencing teenagers who choose to remain virgins are fear of pregnancy (94 percent) and contracting HIV/AIDS (92 percent). Since knowledge and awareness of HPV in this age group is poor to begin with, teens will not view this vaccine as a reason to become sexually active at an age sooner than intended. And parents who worry about the vaccine causing promiscuity should remind themselves of the two most dangerous and important factors that influence teenagers to become sexually active and engage in high-risk behaviors: peer pressure and the use of alcohol and/or drugs.

Parents who worry about their teens becoming promiscuous can also focus on a crucial method to keep them from becoming sexually active too soon: raising their awareness. Research has shown that parental guidance is one of the most important factors in delaying teenage sexual activity — teenagers who do not have involved parents are most likely to engage in high-risk behaviors. The HPV vaccine can actually help parents guide their teens’ sexual decisions by giving them a window of opportunity to talk about the topic, and to get health care providers involved in the discussion. There is no reason why parents cannot, without any hypocrisy, inform their daughters that the vaccine is not a green light for them to immediately have sex. Rather, it is a strong message that you, their parents, care about their health, and that it’s important to take proactive steps to become a healthy adult. Think of it this way: Getting a car with an airbag, traction control and anti-lock brakes means that the car is safer in the long-run, but these features aren’t a reason to drive recklessly — accidents are still possible. No matter what, the vaccine will not, cannot and should not take the place of good, solid parental guidance.

The bottom line is we as we as parents want to do what is best for our children. We all want to teach them well while they are still in our protective cocoon so that we can trust them with their own judgment when they become independent. If they always followed our best wishes, we wouldn’t need to worry about administering the vaccine at all. However, even teens with the best judgment can face peer pressure and fall victim to bad decisions or other reasons that may cause them to engage in risky sexual behavior, and this makes the case for vaccinating all the more compelling.

5 Benefits Of Yoga Deep Breathing

How often do you think about the way that you breathe? If you’re like most people you probably aren’t aware of how you breathe. But how you breathe can have a huge impact on your life and your health. Medical studies have shown that the simple act of deep breathing can have significant health benefits. Here are the top 5 ways that simply taking a few moments to breathe deeply can really improve your health:

1. Deep breathing reduces stress – When you’re very stressed out stop and take 10 very deep breaths. You will instantly feel more relaxed. Try it, you’ll see. Deep breathing supplies the oxygen that your body needs to function well and that extra influx of oxygen can revitalize your body and your mind which will reduce stress and help keep you calm.

2. Deep breathing reduces pain – Have you ever noticed that doctors and medical personnel tell mothers that are giving birth to breathe deeply? Or maybe you’ve noticed that coaches tell athletes that are injured on the field to take deep breaths? That’s because when you take deep breaths your body releases endorphins. Endorphins are your body’s way of fighting pain.

3. Deep breathing helps you relax – Have you ever been told to breathe deeply and count to 10 when you’re angry or upset? Breathing deeply will help your relax and calm down which is why people are encouraged to breathe deeply when they are angry or upset. Taking deep breaths will increase the oxygen flow to your brain which will help you calm down.

4. Deep breathing can reduce your risk of high blood pressure – There are some medical studies that show a connection between high blood pressure and a shallow, fast breathing rate. So the faster your breathing rate is the more likely you are to suffer from high blood pressure. Taking time each day to be more aware of your breath and to breathe slowly and deeply can help you lower your risk of high blood pressure.

5. Deep breathing can increase your energy level – Do you have trouble staying awake after lunch? Do you always feel your energy dip in the mid-afternoon? Millions of people have problems keeping their energy levels up during the day and turn to caffeine or other stimulants when you can get the same energy boost by taking some time to breathe deeply. The extra oxygen that you get from those deep breaths can give you all the boost that you need to get through your day.